HUMBLE PIE – ” Official Bootleg Vol 1 ” Record Store Day 2019

Posted: March 4, 2019 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
Tags: , , , , , ,

Humble pie official bootleg artwork

Formed by Steve Marriott in 1969 Humble Pie were one of the first super group rock bands to form, the original band line-up featured lead vocalist and guitarist Steve Marriott from the Small Faces, vocalist and guitarist Peter Frampton from The Herd, former Spooky Tooth bassist Greg Ridley and a seventeen-year-old drummer, Jerry Shirley. Signed to Andrew Loog Oldham’s Immediate label. •After two albums for Immediate, Humble Pie switched to A&M Records, and began their ascent to conquering the theatres, then arenas of North America, culminating in 1972’s double live “Performance: Rockin’ The Filmore”. Frampton would leave to pursue a highly successful solo career, to be replaced by Clem Clempson, and it was this line-up that was captured at the Arie Crown Theatre, Chicago on 22nd September 1972, whilst touring to promote that year’s “Smokin’” opus, from which ‘Hot ‘n’ Nasty’ and ‘C’mon Everybody’ were taken. •

This selection of never legally released bootleg live versions of the 1970′ s supergroup concerts in Chicago 1972, Tokyo 1973 and Charlton Athletic Football Ground in 1974, housed in a gatefold sleeve. This is the first time that they even been officially and legitimately released with much improved audio, and with the input and consent from Humble Pie’ s Jerry Shirley. 

Some of the tracks taken from one of these gigs, the Charlton FC one from May 1974 when the Humble Pie, who were third on the bill that day,stole the honours from headliners The Who,and now 44 years later all who attended can relive that day again.

Humble Pie’s “Official Bootleg Box Set Volume 1” is a raw testament to what this band did best; playing bluesy, gutsy, soulful and often hard rock, live on stage to an adoring audience. Drawn from a variety of mainly audience recordings that have previously only been available as “under the counter” pirate releases, this is an honest, and often unforgiving, tribute to a classic and much missed 70s supergroup. •

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