SAM SAMUDIO feat DUANE ALLMAN – ” Going Upstairs “

Posted: July 7, 2018 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
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Image result for Sam Samudio ‎– Sam, Hard And Heavy

Best known as front man and lead singer for Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs, following the band’s late-1960s collapse, Domingo “Sam” Samudio signed a solo deal with Atlantic Records. Released in 1971, in case you couldn’t figure it out from the cover photo with a somewhat ragged Samudio striking a standard born-to-be-wild poise on a nice lookin’ chopper, “Sam Hard and Heavy” was a clear attempt to update and modernize his sound and image. Teamed with famed producers Jerry Wexler and Tom Dowd, the set was quite different from his Sam the Sham garage moves. Fairly diverse listen, the ten track album offered up a mixture of Samudio originals and interesting covers. Musically the LP bounced all over the spectrum. ‘Lonely Avenue’ opting for a conventional hard rock sound, while the Tex-Mex ‘Don’t Put Me On’ and bluesy ‘Key To The Highway’ harkened back to his frat boy roots. Elsewhere the collection featured support from guitarist Duane Allman (‘Going Upstairs‘ and ‘Relativity’), Also featured The Dixie Flyers and The Memphis Horns.

Covering John Lee Hooker’s ‘Going’ Upstairs’ as an acoustic blues number wasn’t the most original decision, but having Duane Allman provide Dobro was a great choice. The result was to turn what would have been a mundane cover into a snarling, threatening slice of the blues.

This was recorded during the Layla sessions at Criteria Studios in Miami~Sam was recording in Studio B~We were recording in Studio A~ Duane Allman is backing Sam Samudio…you know Sam the Sham and “Woolly Boolly?” This is actually real nice. Sam should have continued doing this type of material with other greats like Duane. The voice is excellent. released on his album Sam Hard and Heavy in 1971

The Dixie Flyers consisting of: Jim Dickinson, Mike Utley, Charlie Freeman, Tommy McClure & Sammy Creason
The Memphis Horns consisting of: Wayne Jackson, Andrew Love, Ed Logan, James Mitchell, Roger Hopps & Jack Hale. 

By the early-1980s Samudio was completely out of the business, working in the Gulf of Mexico as a deck hand on boats running supplies to drilling rigs. He didn’t reappear until 1982 when Ry Cooder sought him out as a collaborator on the soundtrack to the film “The Border”. Samudio reluctantly agreed to participate, playing organ and contributing a pair of songs to the package (‘No Quiero’ and ‘Palomita’).

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