LED ZEPPELIN – ” Led Zeppelin ” Released 31st March 1969

Posted: March 31, 2017 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
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'Led Zeppelin'

48 years ago today, on January. 12th, 1969, music changed for many people. It was on this day that Led Zeppelin released their debut LP . Of course, critics panned the record, but to the record buying public, well they never listened to critics anyway. It only takes the first two seconds of the first song on their first record for Led Zeppelin to make crystal clear exactly what they intend to do – and exactly what they intend to do to you. In the opening to “Good Times Bad Times,” the band drops a two-note attack that falls like a cartoon safe, clearing the air for John Bonham’s syncopated groove, Jimmy Page’s swift-sword guitar and Robert Plant’s high-end howling about sex so loud it gets the neighbors talking. “It really wasn’t a pretty thing,” Plant later said. “It wasn’t supposed to be a pretty thing. It was just an unleashing of energy.”

just a few weeks before their album’s release — opening for Vanilla Fudge and Spirit. Although booking agent Ron Terry had to beg promoter Barry Fey to add Led Zeppelin to the already-sold out show, the band did not disappoint. “You didn’t have to be a genius to know that Zeppelin was going to be a smash,” he later said. “Oh, my God. People were going crazy!” Rock station KLZ was so jammed with calls the next day that Fey had to run a copy of the unreleased self titled album to them, where it played for an entire day.

We could go on for days on the impact that this record had at the time and still has to this day, but you all know that. Just 3 of the songs “Your Time is Gonna Come”, “Good Times Bad Times” and “Communication Breakdown” were Led Zeppelin originals. When Led Zeppelin debut album was released in January 1969, it went to the Top 10 in the U.S. and the U.K. charts, despite lukewarm reviews. The enormity of Zeppelin’s innovation wasn’t entirely easy to recognize. In an era of spiritual transcendence and tales of brave Ulysses, they’d flipped teenage rock & roll’s sex-zonked mania into something huge and seething and mythic- bestial. Eastern mysticism and Mordor and prom-ruling radio gold would all come later.

Page’s vision for the album was so clear that they recorded the entire thing in just 30 hours. “I financed and completely recorded the first album before going to Atlantic,” he later said . “It wasn’t your typical story where you get an advance to make an album: We arrived at Atlantic with tapes in hand.” The result was a new, uncompromising sound and unabashed rock star lifestyle, paving the way for everything from prog-rock to heavy metal.

Led Zeppelin was born from the ashes of the Yardbirds. They had disintegrated in the summer of 1968, leaving guitarist Jimmy Page with the rights to the name — and a series of shows in Scandinavia he was contractually obligated to complete .So he recruited Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham, and the four toured as the New Yardbirds. But by the time they entered Olympic Studios in London in late september 1968 , they had moved their sound away from English folk-rock, into the blues-influenced band Page had always wanted, and soon had a new name, Led Zeppelin, as well.

As with so many great records, when it first came out the critics didn’t care for it. Therefore many people knew it would be good.

On January. 12th, 1969, Led Zeppelin released their self-titled debut LP “Led Zeppelin” in the US. It wouldn’t be released in the UK until March 31st. The LP combined Blues and Rock and was very well received by music fans. A number of the songs were ‘borrowed’ from older Blues musicians who at first were not given any credit.

It was an incredible record that changed the way many looked at Rock music.

Robert Plant (vocals/production); Jimmy Page (guitar); John Paul Jones (bass); John Bonham (drums)

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