Townes Van Zandt, has a previously unreleased collection of songs titled “Sky Blue” to be released via Fat Possum on the 7th March (which would have been his 75th birthday).

The recordings were made in early 1973 with the late Bill Hedgepeth, a journalist, musician, and most crucially a close friend of Townes Van Zandt. The singer-songwriter was splitting his time between Texas, Colorado, and a shack outside Franklin, Tennessee: an itinerant life that informed many of his most famous and beloved tunes. Throughout his life he would often return to Hedgepeth’s home studio in Atlanta, later with family in tow, to record, re-work, and experiment with new songs as well as some of his most iconic.

In addition to a handful of old favourites, Sky Blue also includes two new songs that have never been heard before “All I Need”and “Sky Blue”There are early, raw versions of Pancho & Lefty and Rex’s Blues, covers of songs by Richard Dobson and Tom Paxton, a smoky version of Blue Ridge Mountain Blues and a scarred and scarring interpretation of Hills of Roane County, an East Tennessee murder ballad from the 1880s that was popularized by Tony Rice.

http://

Releases March 7th, 2019

Advertisements

Fort Frances

Fort Frances return after two years with the new single and lyric video for “Double Take,” the Fort Frances’ rallying cry and a perfect way to start 2019. The band’s first piece of new material following 2016’s third album Alio and a beachy follow-up single “Summertime,” “Double Take” finds Fort Frances returning to the fore in style with a resounding rejection (that’s right) of the sh*tstorm that’s come to be our daily lives.

“I have been writing these songs as the wheels of the world feel they are falling off,”  says Fort Frances’ David McMillin  “Double Take”  is about stopping the car in the middle of the road to take another look around — to see beyond the headlines and look out to the horizon, to take some extra time and figure out a real direction forward. It’s taken more than two years to me feel like I’m actually capable of taking a breath and letting my brain disconnect from the cycle of did-you-hear-what-happened-now breaking news. Now that I have, I think we have the most complete and cohesive collection of songs Fort Frances has ever finished.”

Together with bandmates Jeff Piper, Aaron Kiser, and Jason Ryan, McMillin takes the audience on a journey of endless news cycles and social media feeds; of theoretically “massive” stories that surrender to the next day’s trend overnight; of a deluge of push notifications, emails and texts:

Live At Winterland

First and foremost, to have this album on vinyl – is incredible! because as you’ll clearly hear – this baby rocks! Humble Pie had to rock because they followed a blazing performance by Slade. From a concert on May 6th, 1973 at San Francisco’s Winterland Theatre. Opening this show was a little known band then named Steely Dan. Marriott is on fire from the fist note to the last.
there is more material from this show, maybe so. Most gigs from this time period, however, did not run too much over an hour’s worth of material, especially, when three or more bands shared the bill. My only gripe with this package is the packaging, itself! Open the gate fold & do we get a concert photo of the band at Winterland? No! A generic photo, instead. Winterland has some historic significance that should have been highlighted with some photos of that gig or at least the marquee.

And, why is the included poster that of a gig in Europe? Why not a replica of the hand bill that Bill Graham had reproduced of the gig at Winterland? Cleopatra Records gets an A+ for releasing this on vinyl. The sound is fantastic! Cleopatra Records gets a D for liner notes. Do your homework, guys. This is historical stuff and deserves the full package and better information.

This live recording of Humble Pie was made at San Francisco’s Winterland Ballroom in May of 1973, during what many consider to be the band’s creative peak. This Winterland show being only the fifth show recorded for the then brand-newly syndicated King Biscuit Flower Hour radio concert series, features a blistering set of material. From “I Don’t Need No Doctor” to the infectious Top 10 hit “Hot ‘N Nasty” this recording features all the essential music from the Humble Pie catalogue. And since the band built their reputation on legendary live shows, is arguably better than anything the band ever did in the recording studio.

Humble Pie first came together on New Year’s Eve, 1968/69. Marriott had just played a disastrous gig with The Small Faces, whose opening act, oddly enough, was Ridley’s Spooky Tooth. Frampton had already left The Herd and was forming a new band with Shirley, a child prodigy drummer, who was only 16 at the time. Marriott called Shirley after the show and asked if he and Ridley could join the new band he and Frampton were assembling. According to Shirley, he couldn’t believe a singer as acclaimed as Steve Marriott was even interested, and was “thrilled” at the prospect of what the new band could achieve.

The band made its debut in April of 1969, but almost collapsed at the onset. Despite the media hoopla surrounding their supergroup status and a slew of critical raves, Humble Pie’s early albums (As Safe as Yesterday Is and Town and Country – both on Oldham’s Immediate label) were not commercial hits. Marriott and Frampton couldn’t decide if the band should move in an acoustic or electric direction, a dilemma that made the initial records hard to market. The band also had to hit the road before they really had time to work out their live show, and early tours were mostly lackluster as a result. Then, in 1970, the tides began to turn.

The band hired Dee Anthony as its manager, who promptly signed them to A&M Records. The band recorded Humble Pie and Rock On in 1970 and ’71, respectively. Both albums forged the band into a solid – and very electric – blues/rock machine. The critics got behind the band en masse, and records began selling in large numbers. By the time the band had recorded and released Rockin’ The Fillmore in 1971, the word had spread: Humble Pie was one of the hottest live band since the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Just then, Frampton decided he didn’t feel comfortable in the band’s hard rockin’ blues direction and left to pursue a solo career. While the most memorable material from Rockin’ The Fillmore (“I Don’t Need No Doctor,” “4 Day Creep” and the soulful remake of Ray Charles’ “Hallelujah I Love Her So”) also appear on this LP, but the versions differ dramatically, as Frampton had since been replaced by Dave “Clem” Clempson.

Though some in the rock press predicted the band’s demise upon Frampton’s departure, the opposite seemed to happen. Clempson revitalized the band, and helped take it in an even harder direction. When the band returned in 1972 with Smokin’, they had become a well-oiled rock ‘n’ roll dynamo. Five of the album’s tracks – “Hot ‘N Nasty,” “30 Days In The Hole,” “Road Runner,” “You’re So Good For Me” and Eddie Cochran’s classic “C’mon Everybody” – soon became radio staples. Smokin’ became a multi-platinum Top 10 smash, and remains the best selling album of the band’s career.

This concert was recorded while the band was promoting Eat It!, a double LP that featured three sides of studio songs and one side of live material. Though Eat It! went to the Top 15, and Humble Pie had firmly established themselves as a powerful live act, the band’s powers (and their popularity) seemed to gradually decline following this tour. The band returned in 1974 with Thunderbox, but the constant focus by the media and the fans on Steve Marriott began taking its toll within the group. In 1975, Humble Pie reunited in the studio with ex-manager Andrew Oldham, and recordedStreet Rats, a quirky collection of tracks, including three Beatles covers. The band embarked on a “Farewell” tour, and called it a day.

Though Humble Pie never quite reached the commercial status of Led Zeppelin or Eric Clapton, they did leave an indelible mark on the contemporary rock music. The passion of Marriott’s blue-eyed soul, the powerful blast of the band’s clever rhythm section, compounded by the skillful guitar work of Frampton (and later, Clem Clempson), will forever keep Humble Pie near the head of the blues/rock class of legends.

Band

  • Steve Marriott – Guitar, vocals.
  • Clem Clempson – Guitar, backing vocals.
  • Greg Ridley – Bass guitar, vocals
  • Jerry Shirley – Drums.

Image may contain: 3 people, flower, child and outdoor

Another Milk! Records signee, the mint rock trio Loose Tooth dropped their second LP, “Keep Up” in 2018. I must admit I was skeptical: How can Melbourne keep up the guitar-pop bands of such quality, But Loose Tooth were a pleasant surprise. Their transcendent rock certainly takes cues from bands like The Cure and that classic Melbourne jangle, but it’s nevertheless some of the freshest sounds coming out of the Australian metropolis. Etta Curry, Luc Dawson and Nellie Jackson know a thing or two about hooks, and “Keep On” is especially infectious, like a pleasant nag. With Barnett on their side and plenty of catchy rock melodies in their heads, this Loose Tooth won’t fall out anytime soon.

‘Keep On‘ is taken from Loose Tooth’s album ‘Keep Up’ out now:

Australian singer/songwriter Stella Donnelly has announced her debut album, “Beware of the Dogs, due out on March 8th via Secretly Canadian, and the news arrived with a great new single, “Old Man” and its accompanying ‘90s-inspired music video. On the song, Donnelly serves up more of her signature biting critique with extra helpings of humor and ballsiness. “Oh are you scared of me old man, or are you scared of what I’ll do?,” she sings, almost teasing, but meaning business. Another timely lyric follows: “You grabbed me with an open hand. The world is grabbing back at you.” Donnelly sings sweetly, but the men in her songs ranging from her mean boss in “Mechanical Bull” to the powerful desk-dwellers in “Old Man” are anything but.

Donnelly sticks up for herself with grace and wit, and if this first single is any indication, Beware of the Dogs will be a smart, satirical introduction to what’s sure to be an exciting career in music. The Perth songwriter has a U.K Tour set for April/May She will be at the Bodega on the 5th May 2019.

Image may contain: 1 person, playing a musical instrument and guitar

Aztec Camera  a Scottish Indie/pop/new wave band was formed by Roddy Frame, the group’s singer, songwriter, and only consistent member. Formed in 1980, Aztec Camera released a total of six albums: “High Land, Hard Rain” (1983), “Knife” (1984), “Love” (1987),“Stray” (1990), “Dreamland”(1993) and “Frestonia”(1995).The band garnered popular success for the songs “Oblivious”, “Somewhere in My Heart” and “Good Morning Britain” (a duet with former Clash guitarist Mick Jones).

The band’s first UK single release was sold in a 7″ vinyl format by Postcard Records a Glasgow-based independent record label co-founded by Edwyn Collins and Alan Horne—in 1981. The single featured the song “Just Like Gold” and a B-side entitled “We Could Send Letters”; an acoustic version of the latter song appeared on a collectable compilation album, entitled C81, that was released on cassette in 1981 through a partnership between NME magazine and Rough Trade Records. Frame, was just aged 16 years, He met Collins for the first time during the Postcard period when the latter was 21 years old.

A second single, also released in 1981, featured the songs “Mattress Of Wire” and “Lost Outside The Tunnel”. Following the two 7″ vinyl releases with Postcard, the group signed with Rough Trade Records in the UK and Sire Records in the United States for their debut album. At this point, the band was officially a quartet: Roddy Frame (vocals, guitar, harmonica), Bernie Clark (piano, organ), Campbell Owens (bass) and Dave Ruffy (drums, percussion).

Aztec,Camera:,High,Land,,Hard,Rain.,Gatefold,LP,and,7,EP,High Land, Hard Rain; Aztec Camera

High Land, Hard Rain (1983)

When it appeared in the spring of 1983, Aztec Camera’s debut album, High Land, Hard Rain, was an acoustic-driven breath of fresh air. Led by teenaged singer/songwriter/guitarist Roddy Frame, the Scottish band offered a batch of memorable songs that deserved a broader audience than they reached at the time, from the infectious “Oblivious” and “Pillar to Post” to the introspective “The Bugle Sounds Again.” Frame went on to release another five Aztec Camera albums before recording under his own name.

Aztec Camera’s debut album, “High Land, Hard Rain” was produced by John Brand and Bernie Clarke for the Rough Trade record label. The album was released in April 1983 and was distributed in different formats on Domino Recording Co. The album was successful, garnering significant critical acclaim, Frame later revealed that the song “Oblivious” was consciously written as a Top of the Pops type pop song and received a corresponding degree of popularity.

During the recording process for the album, Frame used a different guitar for every song. For the song “Orchid Girl”, Frame explained in 2013—during the 30th anniversary tour that he was attempting to merge the influences of his favorite guitarist at the time,  jazz player Wes Montgomery, and punk rock icon Joe Strummer. In a late 1990s television interview, Frame explained that a “boy” image was associated with him during this era, and that he was annoyed by it at the time, as he was taking his music very seriously—”you don’t want to be called ‘boy’; especially when you’re listening to Joy Division” but he eventually stopped caring about it.

After “High Land Hard Rain”, Bernie Clarke left the band, and was replaced by Malcolm Ross on second guitar and backing vocals. Aztec Camera changed record labels once again for the release of their second album, “Knife”, which was released through Warner Music .

Frame revealed in a May 2014 BBC radio interview that he was not informed of the ownership arrangements of the record deal, stating that he was unaware as an 18-year-old that the record company would own the rights to all of his corresponding recordings.  After “High Land, Hard Rain”, Frame spent a significant amount of time living in New Orleans, listening to Bob Dylan’s album “Infidels”. Upon reading that Dire Straits’ guitarist and singer Mark Knopfler produced the album, Frame began writing songs based on a sound that he thought Knopfler could work with.

Knife (Expanded)

Knife (1984)

Frame signed the band to the WEA record label—at the time his manager was Rob Johnson  and he secured Knopfler as the producer for Aztec Camera’s second album,“Knife”, which was released in 1984; Frame explained in 1988 that Knopfler was very “professional” and efficient during the recording process. Frame’s experimental mindset in relation to music emerged on “Knife”, as the duration of the titular song is nearly nine minutes and synthesizers appear throughout the album. Prior to the album’s release, the band previewed a selection of songs as part of a performance for the BBC television show Rock Around The Clock and the song “All I Need is Everything” received radio airplay subsequent to release. In a 2007 interview alongside Collins, Frame explained further:
He’s [Knopfler] a great guitarist. recording techniques were great—you [Collins] would have liked him, ‘cos that was then, it was quite a thing. ‘Cos everyone was going digital, and going MIDI and all that, and his thing was all about using the right microphone. If you use the right microphone, then you don’t have to use too much EQ and all that stuff, and it was all about that. Yeah, I kinda liked that—the right mic[rophone], the right amp[lifier], the right kind of board and stuff.

Love“Love” (1987)

At the time that the band’s third album “Love”(1987) was created, Frame was the only original member of the band involved with the project; Love and future Aztec Camera albums were written and recorded by Frame under the “Aztec Camera” moniker, and session musicians recorded with Frame on a track-by-track basis.

Frame explained in August 2014 that he contemplated the conception of “Love” during a three-year hiatus following the release of “Knife”. Frame said that he moved even further away from the British “indie ethic” and was listening to the “pop end of hip hop”, Frame wanted to make a record based on such influences and “Working In A Goldmine” the first song to achieve this aspiration.

Frame relocated to the US to record the album—”pretty much against the wishes of Warner Brothers“, who were unsure of his decision-making at the time—and was primarily based in Boston, Massachusetts, and New York. Frame recorded with American session musicians, like Marcus Miller and David Franke, and explained that his audience was “mystified” by the transformation of the band, but he was “too far gone” to care and just wanted to do his “own thing” by that stage. Due to the significant change of musical direction, the album’s first three singles did not make a strong impression in the marketplace.

The “Love” album produced the popular song “Somewhere In My Heart”, recorded by Frame with dance, R&B and pop producer Michael Jonzun in Boston. Frame said in 2014 that the song has been “great” for him, but at the time of creating the album, the song was not “in keeping” with the rest of “Love”, Frame revealed in a radio interview with the “Soho Social” program, presented by Dan Gray, that he considered “Somewhere In My Heart” an odd song and initially thought it would be best as a B-side.

“Somewhere in My Heart” is the twelfth single and biggest hit by the Scottish band. It was released as the third single from their 1987 studio album “Love”.

Frame was asked during a television interview, following the release of “Love”, about the new sound of the album, and he referenced artists like Anita Baker and Luther Vandross. When asked if the album could be labelled “Middle of the road (MOR)”, Frame replied: “Call it what you like. I don’t really mind.”

Stray [Deluxe Edition]

Stray (1990)

For the band’s fourth album, “Stray”, Frame collaborated with the Clash’s Mick Jones on the song “Good Morning Britain”, He and Jones also toured with the band following the album’s release. Jones performed as Aztec Camera at the Glasgow Barrowlands and the Ibiza Festival in 1990.

In a 1990 interview, Frame explained that he wrote “Good Morning Britain” in 45 minutes after a two- to three-hour conversation with Jones in the canteen of a London rehearsal studio that both Big Audio Dynamite and Aztec Camera were using.  In an August 2014 radio interview, Frame elaborated further, stating that at the time he wrote the song, Jones lived near his London home; Frame had visited Jones after recording the song and said to the Clash guitarist, “You’ll either sing on it, or you’ll want to sue me”, as Frame believed the song was so similar to Jones’ previous work.

Dreamland

“Dreamland” (1993)

Frame then recorded the next Aztec Camera album,”Dreamland”, with Japanese composer Ryuichi Sakamoto. Released in 1993, While mixing the album at Hook End Manor, an 18th-century red-brick building that had been converted into a studio in the Berkshire countryside of England, UK, Frame explained that he waited for a lengthy period of time to work with Sakamoto, due to the latter’s busy schedule. Frame finally met with Sakamoto in Ibiza and both eventually recorded the album in New York City, US over a four-week period. Frame’s interest in Sakamoto was elaborated upon in a latter interview.
I liked what he did when he was in the Yellow Magic Orchestra, and I also liked that album where he plays the music from Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence on piano. That’s where you realise that the atmosphere around his compositions is actually in the writing. Frame’s routine consisted of: working in the studio from the early afternoon until around 2. a turkey sandwich at a deli off Times Square (“because it was possible to get one at two in the morning, and for no other reason”); a cab-ride back to the Mayflower Hotel, where he was staying; an hour of listening to Shabba Ranks; and then bed.

“Frestonia” (1995)

For Frame’s final album under the Aztec Camera moniker, and the last original studio recording for the WEA label, Frame worked with renowned production team Langer-Winstanley, who had previously worked with Madness and Elvis Costello. “Frestonia” was released in 1995 and the Reprise Records label issued it in the US. “Sun” (1996) was the only one song from the album that was released as a single. After the release of “Frestonia”, Frame finally decided to record under his own name in the future and was no longer a Warner artist.

There has been three Aztec Camera “Best of” compilations released: “The Best Of Aztec Camera” was released in 1999 by Warner ESP. that specialised in compilations; in 2005,Deep and Wide and Tall was released by the Warner Platinum series; and “Walk Out To Winter: The Best Of Aztec Camera” , a two-disc collection that was released by the Music Club Deluxe label in 2011.

Since the Stray Tour in 1990, Frame has merged a segment of the Bob Dylan song “It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” into “Down The Dip”, from “High Land, Hard Rain”, and this version of the song was played by Frame at subsequent live shows, Around 2012, Frame included a segment of the Curtis Mayfield song “People Get Ready” in live solo versions of the song “How Men Are”, from the “Love” album. In October 2013, a book entitled The Lyrics: Roddy Frame containing the entirety of Frame’s lyrical work with Aztec Camera.

I remember this from the 70s, it was the first time I ever seen them, I rushed out and bought “Heat Treatment” ASAP, and saw them twice at university, they were absolutely electrifying live band, the second time they played for so long the uni staff threatened to cut off the power if they played another encore

Graham Parker and the Rumour Live/Sight and Sound in concert/Golders Green Hippodrome, London. March 17th, 1977. BBC Broadcast.

Intro (Annie Nightingale). 1) WHITE HONEY 2) HOTEL CHAMBERMAID 3) LADY DOCTOR 4) HEAT TREATMENT 5) SILLY THING 6) HOWLIN’ WIND 7) FOLLS GOLD 8) BACKTO SCHOOL DAYS 9) POURING IT ALL OUT 10) GYPSY BLOOD 11) HEY LORD DON’T ASK ME QUESTIONS 12) HOLD BACK THE NIGHT 13) NOT OF IT PLEASES ME 14) NEW YORK SHUFFLE 15) SOUL SHOES 16) KANSAS CITY

Image may contain: one or more people

We are always on the hunt for hot new Australian bands, we figured Courtney Barnett’s own label, Milk! Records, might be a good place to start the search. There we stumbled upon Melbourne’s Jade Imagine, who combine the best of slacker-rock with a distinctly Aussie surf-pop sound. The band’s frontwoman, Jade McInally, has been on the Melbourne scene since the early 2000s, but it wasn’t until 2016 that she sent a pile of demos to Dave Mudie, Barnett’s drummer. From there, McInally formed Jade Imagine with several other vets of the Aussie indie realm: Liam “Snowy” Halliwell of The Ocean Party and Ciggie Witch, Tim Harvey of Real Feelings and James Harvey of Teeth and Tongue. Together, they’re Jade Imagine, and they’ve yet to release a full-length LP, which means 2019 could be their big year.

from the Debut EP “What The Fuck Was I Thinking” By Jade Imagine, thru Milk! Records

Image may contain: 2 people, guitar

The Boy Least Likely To. are about to release their fifth album so I was keen to find out about it. They discuss the new single and the inspiration behind that standout duo/band name. The boys are long-time friends and have a great love of 1980s bands like Aztec Camera and Altered Images. They have developed since their debut, The Best Party EverThey have been tipped as artists primed for greatness and explain what they have planned for the approaching months. The Boy Least Likely To were looking forward and touring plans for this year. It has been great getting to know one of the most charming and hard-working acts working at the moment.

Jof Yeah, we were originally called Billy the Kid and The Hole in the Wall Gang but we Googled ‘hole in the wall gang’ and it came up with loads of stuff about men who put their penises through holes in public toilet doors – so we decided to go for something else. There are probably some early demo. C.D.s of the first single we released with the wrong name on somewhere in the world. In the end, we just thought The Boy Least Likely To was a nicer fit for us. It’s kind of how we felt about our place in music at the time. I don’t think anyone ever expected us to amount to anything, least of all us.  We just kept trying different instruments out until we found the one that fitted: the banjo, the glockenspiel; the recorder… whatever it was.

No one else was really using those sorts of sounds when we started out. But we just wanted to make a record that sounded completely unlike anything else that we were hearing at the time.

It wasn’t us trying to be weird or quirky, I don’t think. We just tried everything until it sounded right to us. It probably sounded completely wrong to everyone else. We were just really aware that we didn’t want to make a traditional ‘Rock’ record. I still think the same way really. I just want to make records that sound like they could only have been made by us.

http://

 

Image may contain: one or more people and glasses

French band Beat Mark teams up with British band The Proper Ornaments on a split 7″ inches single to embody their friendship built on several gigs around France and England these last years. “Flowers” by Beat Mark is a lovely indie-pop gem that recalls their debut LP “Howls of Joy” published in 2010. Built on the double singing of Karin Schlageter and Julien Perez, some nice jazzy guitar tones evoking the subtle sound of Orange Juice or Aztec Camera, it’s delicate and fresh as a daisy. “Two Weeks” is everything we love with The Proper Ornaments, the lovely harmonies of Max Claps (Let’s Wrestle) and James Hoare (Veronica Falls, Ultimate Painting), a Byrdsian jangly guitar and something that also calls to mind the pop side of The Velvet Underground. This 7′ on Croque Macadam encapsulates the best of both bands, strictly limited to 350 copies, it should be sold-out pretty soon.

http://