Archive for the ‘ALBUMS’ Category

‘Here Come The Nice’ is the ultimate, indispensible tribute to Swinging London’s finest and best-loved pop heroes! The Small Faces the set includes.
4 CDs | 75 songs remastered from the original tapes | 72-page hardback book, lavishly illustrated | Over 90 classic, rare & previously unpublished photos & memorabilia | Definitive sleeve notes include new & archive interviews | 3 rare singles in red, white & blue vinyl | Olympic Studios 7-inch replica acetate | 64-page softcover illustrated lyric book | Track-by-track illustrated guide to every song on the box set | 5 postcards with rare photos & artwork | Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake facsimile press kit | 2 large-size reproduction posters | 2 exclusive Gered Mankowitz fine art prints
Written contributions from Robert PlantPaul WellerDavid BowieNick MasonPeter FramptonChris RobinsonGlen MatlockChad SmithPaul Stanley & many more.

“In forensic detail and with a sleevenote by Pete Townshend, this 4-CD box rights the wrongs wreaked on Marriot & Lane, McLagan and Jones’s peak years.”

“The Mod scamps’ best work, finally given due respect.”

“It’s the package of the year, beautifully crafted for the Small Faces fanatic in all of us.”

“An impeccable monument to the greatest pop group this country ever produced.”

“Now at last, this massive box set finally set’s to rights not only the band’s legacy but also the actual sounds created. Beautifully presented, meticulously researched and annotated this is the only Small Faces recording you will ever need…” 

“Lavish, four-CD retrospective includes unreleased material, out-takes, and alternate versions. Sheds new light on an extraordinary pop experiment.” 
8/10 – 2-page review by Paul Moody
CLASSIC ROCK – April 2014

In celebration of the Small Faces’ induction into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, Charly Records are proud to present ‘Here Come The Nice’, a deluxe heavyweight 4 CD box set chronicling the group’s career on Andrew Loog Oldham’s pioneering Immediate Records label, curated by surviving band members Kenney Jones and Ian McLagan.

A whopping 75 songs includes every hit single, A & B side released worldwide on Immediate Records plus a generous bounty of unreleased material, outtakes, early and alternate versions, live tracks and previously unheard recording sessions from Olympic, Trident and IBC Studios, all sourced and remastered from recently discovered original master and multitrack tapes.

The lavish 72-page hardback book, with a heartfelt foreword by Pete Townshend and introduction by Kenney and Mac, is full of previously unseen photos and rare memorabilia, a career overview by esteemed Mojo magazine scribe Mark Paytress, The box is crammed full with exclusive extras, such as replicas of three of the rarest Small Faces EPs in colored vinyl, an impossibly rare Olympic Studios acetate, large-size repro posters, fine art prints, 64-page fully illustrated lyric booklet, collectors postcards and more, all paying testament to the enduring musical genius of the Small Faces.

What’s In The Box?

Lavishly illustrated 72 page hardbound coffee table book: 
Introduction by Kenney & Mac plus a foreword by Pete Townshend.
Over 90 classic, rare & previously unpublished photos & memorabilia.
Definitive sleeve notes include new & archive interviews.
Exclusive Gered Mankowitz interview on photographing ‘Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake’.

Track-by-track illustrated guide to every song on the box set.

Lyric Booklet: 
64-page fully illustrated song booklet with rare photos & memorabilia.
Complete lyrics transcribed & endorsed by band members for the first time ever.

Red, white and blue coloured vinyl: 
Three replica 7-inch EPs of the rarest Small Faces vinyl originally released in 1967:
Small Faces album sampler – Excerpts from the Small Faces LP.
Here Come The Nice 4 song French EP in picture sleeve.
Itchycoo Park 4 song French EP in picture sleeve.

Replica Studio Acetate:
Olympic Sound Studios one-off acetate pressing for Andrew Loog-Oldham for the song Mystery.

Two large reproduction posters: 
Reproductions of original posters for the Tin Soldier single featuring photography by Gered Mankowitz 
Newcastle City Hall live concert from 1968.

Press kit for Ogden’s Gone Nut Flake: 
Rare 6-panel Immediate Records Press Kit from 1968.

Double sided postcards: 
Five collector’s edition postcards with rare photos of each Small Faces band member backed with memorabilia from the Immediate Records Archive.

Fine art prints: 
Two beautiful prints provided by Gered Mankowitz from his 1967 Itchycoo Park photo sessions.

CD1 – Small Faces Singles Worldwide As Bs & Eps:

1. Here Come The Nice (mono) 2:55
2. Talk To You (mono) 2:05
3. (Tell Me) Have You Ever Seen Me (mono) 2:15
4. Something I Want To Tell You (mono) 2:07
5. Get Yourself Together (mono) 2:16
6. Become Like You (mono) 1:56
7. Green Circles (mono) 2:32
8. Eddie’s Dreaming (b-side edit) (mono) 2:41
9. Itchycoo Park (mono) 2:44
10. I’m Only Dreaming (mono) 2:22
11. Tin Soldier (mono) 3:19
12. I Feel Much Better (mono) 3:55
13. Lazy Sunday (mono) 3:02
14. Rollin’ Over (Part II of Happiness Stan) (mono) 2:12
15. Mad John (single version) (mono) 2:07
16. The Journey (single version) (mono) 2:51
17. The Universal (mono) 2:42
18. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass (mono) 2:47
19. Afterglow Of Your Love (single version) (mono) 3:22
20. Wham Bam Thank You Mam (mono) 3:18

Original Immediate single versions. Taken from original mono master tapes.

CD2 – Small Faces In The Studio – Olympic, IBC & Trident Sessions – Part 1:

1. Shades Of Green (mono) 0:38
2. Green Circles (take 1) (mono) 1:04
3. Green Circles (take 1 alt mix 1) (mono) 2:45
4. Anything (tracking session) (stereo) 3:46
5. Anything (backing track) (stereo) 3:06
6. Show Me The Way (stripped down mix) (stereo) 2:09
7. Wit Art Yer (tracking session) (mono) 2:50
8. Wit Art Yer (backing track) (stereo) 2:27
9. I Can’t Make It (alt mix) (stereo) 2:26
10. Doolally (tracking session) (mono) 4:06
11. What’s It Called? (overdub session) (mono) 0:36
12. Call It Something Nice (take 9) (stereo) 2:04
13. Wide Eyed Girl (take 2) (stereo) 1:43
14. Wide Eyed Girl On The Wall (alt mix) (stereo) 3:28
15. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass (stripped down mix) (stereo) 3:21
16. Red Balloon With A Blue Surprise (take 5) (stereo) 0:46
17. Red Balloon (alt mix) (stereo) 4:29
18. Saieide Mamoon (tracking session) (stereo) 9:36

All tracks previously unreleased versions. Taken from original studio multitrack and session master tapes

CD3 – Small Faces In The Studio – Olympic, IBC & Trident Sessions – Part 2:

1. Wham Bam Thank You Mam (alt mix) (stereo) 3:22
2. I Can’t Make It (stripped down mix) (stereo) 2:33
3. This Feeling Of Spring (take 1) (stereo) 1:43
4. All Our Yesterdays (backing track) (mono) 2:09
5. Talk To You (alt mix) (stereo) 2:22
6. Mind The Doors Please (mono) 5:01
7. Things Are Going To Get Better (stripped down mix) (stereo) 2:43
8. Mad John (tracking session) (stereo) 3:58
9. A Collibosher (take 4) (stereo) 3:31
10. Lazy Sunday Afternoon (early mix) (mono) 3:00
11. Jack (backing track) (stereo) 3:35
12. Fred (backing track) (stereo) 3:06
13. Red Balloon (stripped down mix) (stereo) 1:33
14. Kolomodelomo (take 1) (stereo) 2:45
15. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass (alt mix) (stereo) 3:34
16. Jenny’s Song (take 2) (stereo) 4:04

All tracks previously unreleased versions. Taken from original studio multitrack and session master tapes

CD4 – Alternate Small Faces Outtakes & In Concert:

1. Itchycoo Park (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 2:50
2. Here Come The Nice (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 3:01
3. I’m Only Dreaming (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 2:23
4. Don’t Burst My Bubble (mono) 2:24
5. I Feel Much Better (stereo) 3:56
6. Green Circles (take 1 Italian version) (mono) 2:44*
7. Yesterday, Today And Tomorrow (alt mix) (stereo) 1:50*
8. Piccanniny (alt mix) (stereo) 3:02
9. Get Yourself Together (alt mix) (stereo) 2:18*
10. Eddie’s Dreaming (take 2 alt mix) (stereo) 2:44*
11. (Tell Me) Have You Ever Seen Me (take 2 alt mix) (stereo) 2:08*
12. Up The Wooden Hills To Bedfordshire (US alt mix) (mono) 2:00*
13. Afterglow Of Your Love (alt single version) (mono) 3:36*
14. (If You Think You’re) Groovy (mono) (The Lot Version)- P.P. Arnold & Small Faces 2:55
15. Me You And Us Too (mono) 3:32
16. The Universal (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 2:39
17. Rollin’ Over (live) (stereo) 2:29
18. If I Were A Carpenter (live) (stereo) 2:29
19. Every Little Bit Hurts (live) (stereo) 6:12
20. All Or Nothing (live) (stereo) 4:05
21. Tin Soldier (live) (stereo) 3:19

All tracks rare or * previously unreleased versions. Taken from original studio and session master tapes.

Live tracks recorded at Newcastle City Hall 18th November 1968. Taken from Pye Studios master tape, pitch and speed corrected.

Small Faces Box set vinyl:

Small Faces Album Sampler – One-sided promo single – Excerpts From The Small Faces L.P. (mono)
The original 7″ vinyl was issued as a promotional single for the debut Immediate album. Featuring excepts from Get Yourself Together, Green Circles, Talk To You, All Our Yesterdays, Up The Wooden Hills To Bedfordshire with DJ Tommy Vance announcements, the original vinyl has gone on to become the rarest Small Faces single amongst collectors.

Here Come The Nice – French E.P.
Here Come The Nice (mono) – This is the same performance as the regular ‘Here Come The Nice’ mixed to mono but similar to other releases at the time, was subjected to varispeed so plays slightly faster.

Talk To You (mono)
Become Like You (mono)
Get Yourself Together (mono)

Itchycoo Park – French E.P.
Itchycoo Park (mono)
I’m Onky Dreaming (mono)
Green Circles (mono)
Eddie’s Dreaming (mono)

Mystery – Replica acetate
Intended to be a single, a handful of acetates of Mystery were produced for the band and Andrew Loog Oldham to check the mix. For unknown reasons, the single wasn’t released, and Ronnie went back into Olympic to record a new vocal during April 1967 for the newly entitled Something I Want To Tell You. This is a replica of the acetate delivered to Andrew Loog Oldham back in 1967.


Box set


7 is the 7th full-length record from Beach House. It marks the start of a new chapter for the band, who’ve been together for over 13 years and had most recently released an album of b-sides and rarities which they they described as “…a good step for us. It helped us clean the creative closet, put the past to bed, and start anew.”

The new album, 7, is about rebirth and rejuvenation for the group, allowing them the opportunity to rethink old methods in the writing and recording processes and shed some self-imposed limitations. They’ve delivered a truly remarkable work of art in this new album and we can’t wait for you all to experience it for yourselves.

Pre-orders of the album in any format will get early access to stream the record from your  2 weeks before the rest of the world does on May 11th (streaming starts on April 27th!).

Frankie Cosmos‘ new album, Vessel, is available for release on the 30th March from  Sub Pop Records. While listening to the album you can also read along to this new feature on Pitchfork where Greta gives a short breakdown of every song on the album. The New York-native songwriter Greta Kline has shared a bounty of her innermost thoughts and experiences via the massive number of songs she has released since 2011. Like many of her peers, Kline’s prolific output was initially born from the ease of bedroom recording and self-releasing offered by digital technology and the internet. But, as she’s grown as a writer and performer, devising more complex albums and playing to larger audiences, Kline has begun to make her mark on the indie scene.
Her newest record, Vessel, is the 52nd release from Kline and the third studio album by her indie pop outfit Frankie Cosmos. On it, Kline explores all of the changes that have come in her life as a result of the music she has shared with the world, as well as the parts of her life that have remained irrevocable. Frankie Cosmos has taken several different shapes since their first full-band album, 2014’s Zentropy, erupted in New York’s DIY music scene. For the band’s lineup comprises multi-instrumentalists David Maine, Lauren Martin, Luke Pyenson, and Kline. The album’s 18 tracks employ a range of instrumentations and recording methods not found on the band’s prior albums, while maintaining the succinctly sincere nature of Kline’s songwriting.

1. “Caramelize”

Pitchfork: You talk a lot about light and grace and goodness on this song. It’s like the Gospel of Greta.

Greta Kline: I’m not trying to go for a spiritual vibe on this one, but I’ve always really liked religious language, and I read the Bible as literature in school. It’s so huge, but also specific. Spiritual words are used over and over again, so they become bigger than a single word, and this song has a little bit of that. The “you” changes throughout, and it’s about so many different kinds of relationships, and parts of my life, and how they’re patched together.

I actually have a lot of fans that are really religious. There were these students in a priest school who messaged me on Facebook five years ago telling me they loved my music. It’s weird, because I feel that some of my songs are almost too irreverent for that, but it’s cool that anyone can hear their own thing in them.

2. “Apathy”

One line in this song really stands out to me: “I just want to feel like I’m neatly designed/Like a telephone pole.” What inspired your writing here?

I wrote that lyric when I was on tour feeling crazy and wishing that I had a clear purpose that I was designed for; I was in a car driving past a bunch of telephone poles, which are perfectly built. When I hear that line, I think “Oh yeah, duh.” It’s not super poetic. I love poetry, but I’m more inspired by the small moments throughout my life that have meaning. I went through a weird archiving phase when I was younger, where I wanted to capture it all. I was so fixated on archiving my friendships, and my thoughts, my everything. That was kind of how Frankie Cosmos started.

3. “As Often as I Can”

You address your listeners here, telling them, “I love you.”

I love interacting with the audience onstage and telling them, “I love you.” That’s part of why I put that in, because it’s so fun to get to say that out loud to different people every night.

4. “This Stuff”

There’s a lyric from this song that I found funny and kind of sad: “I’m living in a condo/It replaced your favorite movie theater though.”

I feel like a cheater, because someone else told me that story. But the poetic part is me choosing to put it in the song, right? I remember walking around with a friend, and they talked about how their favorite movie theater was being turned into a condo. That’s not funny, but it would make a funny line: That living there would destroy the thing that someone you love also loves.

5. “Jesse”

Why did you guys decide this should be the first single from Vessel? It sounds bigger than most Frankie Cosmos songs.

It’s one of my favorite songs on the record. It also has five instruments, the usual four plus an extra guitar, which is exciting and new. Having someone who was not in the band write a second guitar part for a song was scary, and it took me accepting that the song wasn’t going to sound the same live. Our records are almost like recorded versions of our live set, and I don’t like having a bunch of parts on the record that we can’t achieve live. So coming to terms with the live set being different from the album arrangement was a big part of letting the sound get a little bigger.


You originally released this song in 2014, and you revived some old songs on your last album as well. How do you decide which ones to revisit?

We do it because certain old songs get requested at shows, and we feel like we have to make band versions later. But the more I revisit those old songs, the more they take on different meanings. It’s like reading your old diary, and thinking “wow” at how specific it was. There’s this whole emotional experience to re-learning my old songs, and there are a lot of realizations about my life back then that I can only make now.

7. “Accommodate”

In this song you introduce the idea of how the body can fail you when you need it.

A lot of this album is about this feeling of disconnect between myself and my body, but on “Accommodate,” I’m describing the experience of being a woman; what being born into this body means for the rest of my experience in the world. I really think that my body was not meant to exist in this atmosphere. I’m allergic to everything and I’m weak! Is your body a part of who you are or does it contain all of who you are? Does it stop you from fully being yourself? I don’t know.

8. “I’m Fried”

The lyric “I just wanna know that I would walk away from wrong” stands out to me. What does that mean to you?

For a long time, I wasn’t giving enough love to myself, and it made me so tired. I was like, “I need to figure out how to take care of myself.” “I’m Fried” is all about that, so the line is about wanting to know that I’m gonna be looking out for myself. Not that I’m gonna walk away from being a bad person, but knowing that I’m not going to get myself into situations that are harmful.

9. “Hereby”

This is the halfway point of the album, and it’s the most heartbreaking song on here. Were you aiming to structure the record to have that hurt come midway through?

We thought it’d be a good end to Side A. It’s harsh, and feels like a punctuation mark to the section. It’s also written almost entirely in words that were pulled from a contract. The lyrics are in a very legal language. It was funny to write in this cold way about this sad, personal moment. It’s like, “Here are the facts: I will not be your friend.”

10. “Ballad of R & J”

As opposed to the other songs on the album, this one is a narrative with fictional characters and a story arc.

The song is about being far away from the person you love and not being able to tell if they actually love you. The story was so sad that I refused to sing it, which is why my bandmates sing the choruses. It’s the only Frankie Cosmos song, ever, probably, where I don’t sing the whole thing. The characters in the song, Julie and Ricky, aren’t exactly based on my past relationships, but I wanted to explore who they could be and what they meant to each other. When a feeling is really big and hard to face within myself, I can use fictional narratives to deal with it, and write about it without having to actually ask myself how I’m feeling. It’s the songwriting equivalent of “asking for a friend.”

11. “Ur Up”

At the beginning of this track, you can hear someone in the background telling you the tape is rolling, and you mess up on the piano a little bit. It’s one of the most intimate moments on the album.

I liked keeping the mess-up in there because I love how sweet Hunter [Davidsohn], our recording engineer, sounds when he says, “No, keep going, it’s good.” It’s a little glimpse into the tender moments in the studio.

12. “Being Alive”

There are all these super fast tempo changes on this song.

Our drummer Luke [Pyenson] is very fancy! I can’t remember exactly what happened with arranging “Being Alive,” but my best guess would be to give Luke credit for the tempo. And since forming this band, I’ve gotten way more comfortable singing and messing around on guitar. I’ve been able to come up with really different stuff than I would have on Zentropy.

13. “Bus Bus Train Train”

Your dog, Joe Joe, seems to float throughout so much of your music. Here, he appears as a taxidermy sculpture in a museum.

He’s my best friend and the reason I never moved away from New York. I wanted to be here and spend time with him while he was still alive. Then he died my first year of college, so I was like, “Great.” That one part in this song came from a trip to RISD—I was visiting a friend, and there was this weird room where they had with all these taxidermy animals. But I also think that line is about trying to find him, and trying to find home, wherever I am in the world. For me, Joe Joe represents home.

So I don’t think that line is morbid, and I don’t even feel sad talking about him, because it really feels like he’s alive. This is going to sound really freaky, but I feel like part of his soul entered me when he died, and now I’m part dog. When I make eye contact, dogs will run, pulling their owners towards me to hang out. I feel like I’m almost one of them.

14. “My Phone”

The message of this one—about trying to keep relationships offline—is super relatable. Do you think love can rise above the need to be plugged in all the time?

Real love obviously goes infinitely deeper than technology, and you should be able to feel loved by someone, give love, and have them trust you without having to constantly be texting. I’m a really slow texter, and I’m really bad at responding to people, and none of that matters when you’re hanging out in person. But as a touring musician, I do spend a lot of time on my phone. So many of my relationships exist there, and sometimes feel like I only have friends because I’m texting them or seeing them on Instagram. It’s a weird way to exist.

15. “Cafeteria”

This is a secretly dark one: There’s all these feelings of doubt hidden right beneath this bright sound.

Lots of life is constantly putting on a brave face and not exactly giving everyone the true experience of what you’re feeling. So my songs are a fun place to sneak in those thoughts, right underneath a happy melody, or make something that sounds like a love song but is actually really sad. And “Cafeteria” is so fun to play because it’s all this bouncing around, and it has my favorite lyrics to sing live: “I had sex once, now I’m dead.” It’s insane to be on stage and see everyone get so quiet after I sing that. I always imagine that people can tell that it’s funny. But in my head, I’m almost waiting, wondering: “Are people gonna laugh at that line?”

16. “The End”

This sounds almost like an old Frankie Cosmos song, like a rough demo uploaded straight to Bandcamp.

I recorded it a day after a breakup, right into my computer mic. It’s pure emotion, and not thought through at all. I hadn’t figured out my future, or plans for later. I was sitting alone in this room that I shared with this person who doesn’t love me anymore, and I was like, “Gotta move.”

Did you try to edit or spruce up the song later?

Trust me, if I had recorded it a month later, it would have different lyrics. Because the feeling was so pure and fast. We tried to arrange it with the band, but I was like, “Let’s not waste any more time on this, the demo’s going on the album.” I had this intense feeling that it had to be the demo. It’s my first ever GarageBand song that made it onto vinyl. It was so exciting when I got the test pressing and heard this. I was freaking out.

17. “Same Thing”

Your music has been described as being like an elliptical, musical run-on sentence, and this song feels that way.

This makes me think of the bio for our press release. We were talking about what should go in it, and why we think that people should listen to this album, and I was like, “I don’t. I don’t care.” [laughs] Ultimately, there’s nothing that makes this album more special than any other of the albums. The idea is it’s another chapter, and there’s gonna be a million more. Yes, it’s special to me right now, but it’s also not as important as the 50 new songs I’ve written since. So I don’t know how to promote it, because I’m a person who’s writing a bunch of music all the time, and I’m hopefully gonna do it for many more years. This is just one episode, and I think that’s cool!

18. “Vessel”

How did this become the title for the record?

I had been thinking about the concept of vessels, and it applies to a lot of things I deal with on the album: Not feeling like a woman and not feeling like I was made to make babies; not feeling like a vessel for my art and being projected onto; not feeling like being a performer comes naturally to me. All this relates to how my body is here to support me or hinder me. The other part of it is that this song is partly about being in a band and making music with other people. A lot of this record is about making music.

thanks Pitchfork for the interview

Forth Wanderers

Forth Wanderers employ a tin-can-telephone style of composition which they use even when living in the same area code. Since first collaborating in 2013 as Montclair, New Jersey high schoolers, guitarist and songwriter Ben Guterl and vocalist Ava Trilling have passed songs back and forth like pen pals. Guterl will devise an instrumental skeleton before sending it to vocalist Ava Trilling who pens the lyrics based off the melody. The duo then gather alongside guitarist Duke Greene, bassist Noah Schifrin, and drummer Zach Lorelli to expand upon their demo. It’s a patient and practiced writing system that has carried the quintet through two EPs (2013’s Mahogany and 2016’s Slop) and one LP (2014’s Tough Love). Forth Wanderers, the group’s sophomore record and Sub Pop Records debut, is the groups’ most comprehensive and assured statement yet. On Forth Wanderers these introspections include meditations on relationships, discovery, and finding oneself adrift. Despite the inherent heaviness of those themes, Forth Wanderers feels joyous, a rock record bursting with heart. Take Not for Me, a romping track about “the ambivalence of love. Opener Nevermine, is a surge of confidence inspired by an ex-lover who is still captivated by her image.

On Ages Ago Trilling paints the image of a constantly-shifting enigmatic lover. “I wasn’t sure who they were, they changed constantly (hence the metaphor describing the “grey coat” and cutting their hair just to “stay afloat”),” she says. “I wasn’t going to wait any longer to find out.” Recorded over five days by friend and audio engineer Cameron Konner at his Philadelphia home studio, Forth Wanderers amplifies the heartfelt sentiments of their earlier works into massive anthems. Guterl and Greene’s guitars have never sounded sharper, Schifrin and Lorelli’s terse rhythm section is restless, and Trilling sounds more self-assured than ever. These are exuberant, profound songs driven by tightly bound melodies and a loving attention to detail.

Forth Wanderers (Release Date: April 27, 2018) Sub Pop Records

The 40 Best Yo La Tengo Songs

With the release of the band’s 15th album, There’s a Riot Going On, last week, the time was right to reappraise the trio’s discography  There’s a Riot Going On is a good one, but so far none of its songs have jumped off to become my absolute favorites. That’d be a tall order for any band.

And if you’re somehow wondering who these Yo La Tengo guys are in the first place, well, they’re a Alt rock band—and a really good rock band. The husband-wife team of guitarist Ira Kaplan and drummer Georgia Hubley started the band in Hoboken in 1984, and released four albums with a variety of partners and sidemen and on a handful of labels before incorporating bassist James McNew on the 1992 full-length May I Sing With Me. The next year they released their breakout record Painful on Matador, a partnership that endures to this day.  Painful is where their “disparate influences congealed into a fully formed style of the band’s own, from early ‘60s folk and pop to the post-Velvets diaspora of noise and punk,” and that’s still a good summation. They’re about as likely to play a three-minute pop gem as they are a forlorn folk song, a 10-minute one-note drone, a cover of a classic hit from the ‘70s, or a crazed, 20-minute noise jam. And they do it all with the same level of proficiency, confidence and humility. Again, but they’re are a really good rock band,


All song were original recorded by © Yo La Tengo , except “The Whole of The Law”(by The Only Ones and re recorded by YLT)

Discography, Albums

Ride the Tiger (1986)
New Wave Hot Dogs (1987)
President Yo La Tengo (1989)
Fakebook (1990)
May I Sing with Me (1992)
Painful (1993)
Electr-O-Pura (1995)
Genius + Love = Yo La Tengo (with Jad Fair e Daniel Johnston) (1996)
I Can Hear the Heart Beating as One (1997)
And Then Nothing Turned Itself Inside-Out (2000)
The Sounds of the Sounds of Science (2002)
Summer Sun (2003)
Prisoners of Love: A Smattering of Scintillating Senescent Songs: 1985-2003 (2004)
Yo La Tengo is Murdering the Classics (2006)
I’m Not Afraid Of You And I Will Beat Your Ass (2006)
Popular Songs (2009)
Fade (2013)

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Danish post-punk band Iceage have shared another new track from the band’s forthcoming  fourth studio album  Beyondless, due out on May 4th via Matador Records.

“Take It All” is the third single from their new album and it follows the release of “Catch It” and “Pain Killer,” the latter of which featured guest vocals from Sky Ferreira.
“Catch It” was the band’s first single since their 2013 album Plowing Into The Field of Love,

Their brand new single, “Take It All,” features marching drums, twinkling yet murky guitars and frontman Elias Bender Rønnenfelt mourning the state of the planet (“the world is a crime”) before becoming distracted and utterly mesmerized by the beauty of another human. Rønnenfelt sings as he is reluctantly entranced, “And men were dying for the death of the west / Oh yeah / And the last thing I ever wanted to see was these brand new sparkles / Coming from your ever loving God damned eyes.”

A statement described the sound and themes from the band’s new album, Beyondless:

The intoxication is consistent, this has always been drunk music, but it’s less a stumbling confusion and more a sturdy heartfelt confession with each record. They have finally caught up with their ambition. Their entire charm has always rested in their running ahead of themselves with blind confidence, taunting you to follow and you follow because wherever they are going is vital, is alive; on Beyondless they are treading with an assurance that is disarming, but there is no loss of charm, you are arm in arm now, whispering intimacies.


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Surfer Rosa is one of those perfect debut albums, that lets you know what you’re in for right out of the gate. The blueprint for the album, and for so much of the guitar-based music that followed over the next decade or so, is set within the first minute of the lead track, “Bone Machine.” David Lovering’s spare yet ferocious drums, the sound of them so vast that you wonder if he’s actually playing an oil rig. Kim Deal’s muscular, melodic bassline, underpinning but never overstepping. Joey Santiago drawing blood out of a few crystal-sharp notes of guitar. Black Francis (aka Frank Black) yelping for sixteen bars of agitated verse over a relative lull of music before Santiago yanks the song back into a chorus of blistered lips and “uh-oh!”—the first instance of the loud/soft motif that the band further refine and recalibrate through another dozen frenetic and thrilling songs, most of which combust around the two-minute mark.

The Pixies made Surfer Rosa not long after their formation in Boston, Massachusetts, and just a few weeks after the release of their debut mini album, Come On Pilgrim. Both releases were themselves culled from a March ’87 demo, The Purple Tape, which included embryonic versions of several Surfer Rosa songs: “Break My Body,” “I’m Amazed” and the album’s most straightforwardly hardcore moment, “Broken Face.” At the urging of their British label, 4AD Records, Surfer Rosa saw the Pixies replace Purple Tape producer Gary Smith with a relatively unknown recording engineer, Steve Albini, who was best known at the time for his work with his own band, Big Black. After a get-to-know-you dinner at Lovering’s place, the band and Albini set to work on the record at the newly opened Q Division Studios in Somerville, a few miles north of Boston, which had ironically been recommended to them by the ousted Smith.

Famously opposed to both the title “producer” and the concept of receiving royalties on albums he worked on, Albini was paid a flat fee of $1,500 for his ten days of work on the album, out of a total recording budget of $10,000. He would be similarly forthright in his critiques of the band’s performances, alternately hailing them as “genius” or dismissing them entirely.

In press interviews at the time, the band would characterize Albini as a “brainiac” who loved lo-fi and instruction manuals but had little enthusiasm for “anything human-sounding”—the result of which meant that those ten days of recording were spent honing guitar and drum sounds, with vocal parts left until the very last evening. Special effects were eschewed in favor of an abrasive, unadorned—and soon to be much copied style that found its perfect foil in the Pixies’ deceptively delicate (and often delicately played) songs. Even overdubbing was generally avoided. “He hates overdubs,” Deal had told Melody Maker.

Though the two would later on form a deep friendship (as evidenced by their joint panel at this year’s SXSW festival), Deal was somewhat dismissive of Albini’s methodology in subsequent interviews. But Albini always had a fan in Black Francis. “I like him because he likes loud,” he exclaimed in the same interview. “All the needles were on red. He totally overloaded the tape.”

Assistant engineer John Lupner, meanwhile, was struck by the lengths Albini went to authentically capture the particular sound of Q Division Studios. Not everything was quite so meticulously planned, however. According to John Murphy—Deal’s husband at the time—the abrupt end to “Where Is My Mind?” came about by accident, as a result of the tape running out while the band was playing. “The tape started to go click click click,” he told Frank and Ganz, “and they went, ‘Well, we got most of it.

If there’s an overarching theme to Surfer Rosa, it’s a Lynchian scratching away at the underbelly of modern life to reveal tales of voyeurism, incest, and other deviant behavior. Francis put these preoccupations—that include a rather ahead-of-its-time portrayal, in “Bone Machine,” of a pedophile priest (or “preachy-preach” in Pixies vernacular)—down to his “real hardcore Pentecostal” upbringing. It’s not all about molestation, though. Two songs (“Broken Body” and “Tony’s Theme”) reference superheroes, while several others draw on a six-month period Francis spent as an exchange student in Puerto Rico the inspiration for both the Spanglish lyrics in “Vamos” and “Where Is My Mind?” with its dreamy evocation of snorkeling “in the Car-ibb-e-an.”

Though vocals were left until the final day of recording, they were by no means an afterthought. Indeed, the interplay between the band’s two vocalists, Francis and Deal, would become another Pixies trademark. In keeping with his vérité style, Albini abandoned studio trickery in favor of natural acoustics. Deal’s two most memorable vocal performances—her lead on the bouncing, pop-toned single, “Gigantic” and the oo-oohs that run throughout “Where Is My Mind?”—were recorded in the bathroom, its natural echo proving preferable, as far as Albini was concerned, to any available studio effect. The latter song’s false start jarring and seemingly throwaway on first listen is instructive as to the attention to detail from both band and engineer. Deal’s first ooh, which precedes Francis’s curt instruction to “Stop,” has a sharp rawness to it. When her voice returns in the song proper, it’s engulfed in an underwater haze much more befitting the lyrical reverie.

There are further spoken interjections elsewhere: some within the songs, such as the aforementioned opening to “Bone Machine” and Deal’s similar announcement that “Tony’s Theme” is about “a superhero named Tony,” and some in between. “I’m Amazed” begins with Deal mid-sentence, gossiping about a teacher who’s “into field-hockey players.” “Oh My Golly!” ends with Francis yelling “You fuckin’ die!” at her. He goes on to clarify that he’d done so in jest, in response to her warning that no one mess with her equipment.

Surfer Rosa was released in March 1988 in the UK and remained available only as an import in the United States until late summer, when 4AD signed a North American distribution deal with Rough Trade. Initial U.S. pressings paired the album with Come On Pilgrim. The two works were then reissued separately in 1992, after Elektra Records took on the 4AD catalogue.

Having received largely positive press notices, Surfer Rosa sold solidly in the interim, if unspectacularly—perhaps in part because, like so many landmark albums, it found itself a little far ahead of the curve. Winning the hearts and minds of college radio and Melody Maker (which named the album the best of 1988) would not yet yield widespread success. The album did not go gold in the U.S. until 2005, by which time the Pixies had disbanded, lain dormant for a decade, and then reunited for the first of several deservedly lucrative world tours.

By then, of course, Surfer Rosa had been well and truly canonized as one of the most influential albums of its time, with Nirvana and myriad others taking the Rosa model and running with it, many of them queuing up both to sing its praises and to summon Steve Albini to work his magic to record his own band’s album In Utero . Kurt Cobain listed it as his second favorite album of all time (after Iggy and the Stooges’ Raw Power)

Among the earliest advocates for the band, meanwhile, was one of rock’s greatest statesmen, David Bowie, who would later lament, “I thought it was a hell of a shame that America didn’t recognize its own with the Pixies.” His 2002 album Heathen includes a well-judged cover of Rosa’s “Cactus,” a short and sweet ballad about a prisoner so desperate for something—anything from his wife that he ends up begging her to smear her dress with blood and “send it to meeee.”

Another important step in the album’s elevation came a few years earlier, with David Fincher’s clever use of “Where Is My Mind?” in a pivotal scene toward the end of Fight Club. Since then, that song in particular has become so inescapable that you’ll even hear gentle piano renditions in HBO prestige dramas. Surfer Rosa regularly appears on all-time “best-of” lists online and in print.

  • Black Francis – vocals, rhythm guitar, acoustic guitar
  • Kim Deal – bass, backing vocals, vocals on “Gigantic” (credited as Mrs. John Murphy)
  • Joey Santiago – lead guitar
  • David Lovering – drums

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Devotion is a stunning artistic about-face from revered Melbourne songwriter Laura Jean. Loved for her piercing, intimate, folk-based albums such as 2014’s Laura Jean and 2011’s A fool who’ll, Laura has worked with producer John Lee (Beaches, Lost Animal) to create an enveloping, deep pop album like nothing she has done before.
Laura’s last self-titled album, recorded in the UK with John Parish (Perfume Genius, Aldous Harding, PJ Harvey) and featuring Jenny Hval on backing vocals, was a critical smash in Australia, shortlisted for the Australian Music Prize and nominated for two Age Music Victoria Awards.
The album lead to Australian and New Zealand tours with Aldous Harding and Marlon Williams, plus shows with Julianna Barwick, Jessica Pratt and more.
But soon Laura found herself tinkering with a 90s Kawai keyboard, enjoying its built-in drum rhythms and moody synth sounds. Laura began a series of shows performing with nothing but the keyboard, as the idea for her next album grew and developed.
Devotion is an album about teenage obsession, coastal child- hood and vivid memory – universal themes filtered through Laura’s razor sharp lyrical focus. Initial influences for the record took in R’n’B, 80s adult contemporary pop and 70s disco, but the end result is transformed into something wholly other, full of depth, resonance and mystery.
Played entirely by Laura, John Lee and drummer Dave Williams (Augie March), “Devotion” is both contemporary and timeless. 


About the album, Laura says: “Devotion is about how a lonely coastal childhood filters into a contemporary adult life built hundreds of miles away. I wrote this album for my mum, middle sister and myself as we were at that time – eccentric, romantically-unfulfilled teens and a stressed out single mum trying to have a love life. In those times we needed to hear songs that were loving and uplifting, about the reality of intimacy, longing, romantic risk and reward. The album is narrated by me in the present, a detached adult figure far away from home, but still driven by an inner fantasy world that is set on the beach where I grew up.”

Record Store Day 2018, The Alarm  “Where The Two Rivers Meet”

Saturday April 21st is World Record Store Day and also the day for the release of brand new music from Mike Peters and The Alarm.

Mike Peters and The Alarm will be releasing a very special, limited edition 8 track – vinyl only – mini album entitled Where The Two Rivers Meet Extended Play which will only be available exclusively at participating Record Store Day outlets worldwide.

To celebrate the release, Mike Peters will undertake a 24 Hour Transatlantic Tour performing at Record Stores in the U.K., New York and Los Angeles – all within the same day.

Where The Two Rivers Meet Extended Play features an incredible collaboration with The Cult / Coloursøund guitarist – Billy Duffy on the brand new song Blood Red Viral Black. There are 8 songs in total including a brand new recording / mix of live favourite Two Rivers coupled with Transatlantic, The White Count and Year One which runs at 8.55 minutes in length, making it the longest song in Alarm history (Only three of the eight tracks will appear on the forthcoming album). The original artwork was conceived by Mike Peters and Daniel Shearn and features a spot varnish cover image with full colour inner sleeve.

Where The Two Rivers Meet Extended Play features an ‘electric’ and ‘acoustic’ side and is the prelude to a brand new album release scheduled for June 29th 2018.

The complete track listing of Where The Two Rivers Meet Extended Play is as follows:

Electric Side
Two Rivers
Blood Red Viral Black
The White Count

Acoustic Side
Thirteen Dead Reindeer [Acoustic]
Armageddon In The Morning [Acoustic]
Crowd Trouble [Acoustic]
Year One

#rsd #thealarm

Arcade Fire have announced a reissue of their debut Arcade Fire EP. It’s the first time that the EP has been pressed to vinyl. The Arcade Fire reissue arrives on Record Store Day 2018 (Saturday, April 21) via Legacy Recordings. The band self-released Arcade Fire in 2003. Two years later, Merge Records re-released it on CD. The seven-track release includes “No Cars Go,” which was re-recorded for 2007’s Neon Bible.

This 2003 album preceded the instant classic Funeral, and has been relatively overlooked since Arcade Fire became one of the biggest bands in the world. However, the seven track EP (known unofficially as Us Kids Know) gives an insight into the band’s thematic and musical heart and is a key part of any fan’s collection. Now on vinyl for the first time in transparent blue, limited and numbered.
1. Old Flame  2. I’m Sleeping In A Submarine 3. No Cars Go  4. The Woodland National Anthem 5. My Heart Is An Apple  6. Headlights Look Like Diamonds 7. Vampire / Forest Fire

First time on Vinyl for this 12″ transparent Blue coloured & individually numbered EP, with augmented Gold artwork