Archive for the ‘ALBUMS’ Category

Darlingside – “Futures”
-Have you ever heard of these guys? Say… two songs ago? Anyways, I really like Darlingside .This particular track has their characteristic harmonies while also echoing this sort of Beatles-esque complexity in the string and backing track as well. I genuinely feel that if the Beatles were making music today, it would be along these lines. This is a great album .

Massachusetts in the winter is the perfect place to lock yourself in a living room next to a roaring fire, and Extralife, is the latest album by folk quartet Darlingside, is the perfect album to take with you. It’s crackling and warm like a hearth, soft and faint like the crooning of a breeze. But, it’s also an album that undoubtedly drives its own path, led by the earnest ardour of Dave SenftDon MitchellAuyon Mukharji, and Harris Paseltiner. Each time you listen you will hear something new, as this inventive quartet gives us plenty to mull.

In Extralife you may recognize the characteristic roots of the modern folk sound. Inklings of Bon IverLord Huron, and The Lumineers permeate this indie folk album. Extralife doles out low and rich vocal harmonies, humble acoustic guitar, and reverb-a-plenty. But wedged between these genre staples you might find something. unexpected

Extralife is a record infused with apocalyptic dread, a collection of campfire sing-alongs for the end of days. As well, it’s an oddly beautiful record, comfortable in its unsettling contemplations and rapturous.

They’re lovers, not fighters — four unrelated brothers whose friendship makes the music happen. History has certainly taught us that close friendships make some of the best music (think Lennon and McCartney), but when a band’s sound is forged in fraternity, they are left with the responsibility of creating a connection to make all listeners feel like a part of their brotherhood. To do this, Darlingside attempts to create a sense of place, a tangible mood manifested in hollow, dramatic, room-filling harmonies. Their nouveau “wall of sound” is a vehicle which draws in all those who can’t help but overhear.

Though working within the boundaries of the folk form, Darlingside is musically distinct, crafting a memorable brand of indie alt-folk. They are educated musicians with a sophisticated understanding of songwriting, consequently able to employ unconventional sounds and rhythmic tricks to pique interest in unexpected ways. In their lyrics, Darlingside are wordsmiths in the most literal form, collecting and assembling words into images that reflect the wildest wanderings of their imaginations, even inventing words that exist only in their futuristic, apocalyptic playground. Like fantasy-philes or astrologers, they peel back the layers of dreams with deft lyrical ambiguity. They sing these lyrics with the timbre of a tenor chorus in chant — not just one voice, but a symphony of voices. They sing for the sake of anyone who treasures uncovering meaning in their clouded surroundings.

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The Beatles released their 12th and final LP “Let It Be” on May 8th, 1970. It was released almost a month after the group had broke-up.

The album started out being named “Get Back” where the band was hoping to return to their earlier, less complicated approach to music. It was recorded and projected for release before their album “Abbey Road,” which came out in 1969. Paul McCartney said a new edit of the Beatles movie Let It Be could enter production in the near future.

The original 1970 documentary hasn’t been available in home formats since 1982 as a result of scenes that showed the band in a negative light as the members moved toward their split.

McCartney had been asked about the movie during a recent radio interview. “We keep talking about that,” he said. “We have meetings. … People have been looking at the footage.” He added that he’d been told that a great deal of the unused material showed “a bunch of guys making music and enjoying it.” “Who knows, that may be happening in a year or two,” he noted.

The report also quoted Let It Be cinematographer Tony Richmond, who’d previously said a proposed DVD remaster had been blocked “by George’s Harrison’s estate and his wife and Yoko Ono, because they don’t want the acrimony shown.” In 2007, Apple Corps boss Neil Aspinall said “the film was so controversial when it first came out. When we got halfway through restoring it, we looked at the outtakes and realized: this stuff is still controversial. It raised a lot of old issues.”

Discussing a potential re-release in 2018, McCartney said that he’d had no objection to the idea, though he added that the “objection should be me. I don’t come off well.” He went on to explain that he was “one of the votes” on the board of Apple Corps, and that Ringo Starr, Ono and Olivia Harrison counted as much as he did.

“That’s the secret of the Beatles – can’t do three to one,” he said. “During the breakup was when it got screwed up – we did three against one. But now it has to be unanimous. The two girls are Beatles.”

Because “Let It Be” was supposed to be released before “Abbey Road”, there are those who say that some Abbey Road should be considered the group’s final album.

Happy 46th Birthday to The Beatles’ LP “Let It Be”!!!

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Father John Misty  has announced a new live album, Father John Misty: Live At Third Man Records, out September. 28th through Third Man Records.

Recorded in September of last year, the record features a smattering of tracks that span the career of the psych-pop provocateur, all performed in a stripped-down solo acoustic setting in the tiny Blue Room venue at Jack White’s Third Man Records in Nashville. The performance included a debut performance of the then-unreleased “Mr. Tillman,” as well as an impromptu recording of “Now I’m Learning to Love the War” that was pressed to a 12” and given to a lucky fan in the audience.

Third Man has hosted multiple notable performances in the Blue Room, and the concerts are all recorded direct to acetate for vinyl pressings.

check out FJM’s performance of “Chateau Lobby #4” at Third Man headquarters in Nashville, in which he delivers a stripped-down rendition of I Love You, Honeybear standout track “Chateau Lobby #4 (in C for Two Virgins).”

Stripped of its layered percussion and mariachi horns, the song feels far more somber than celebratory, transforming its spirit of over-the-moon infatuation into something more like sadness. The video, lensed by Dan Newman, intersperses shots of Third Man’s packed Blue Room with close-ups on a scruffy and serious Misty.

Side A:

1. I Love You, Honeybear
2. I’m Writing a Novel
3. Hollywood Forever Cemetery Sings
4. Chateau Lobby #4 (In C for Two Virgins)

Side B:

5. So I’m Growing Old on Magic Mountain
6. Holy Shit
7. Everyman Needs a Companion

Misty also recently shared an outtake from this very same Third Man performance, in which he cuts “I Love You, Honeybear” short after realizing he’s begun his set with the wrong song. The Pure Comedy mastermind continues to tour in support of his magnum opus, sharing numerous live videos from those shows.

The good news is that Adeline Hotel is back with a brand new album. Due for release at the end of October, “Away Together is a collection of ten songs that might signal a change in outlook, at least if lead single ‘Habits’ is anything to go by. It’s probably the happiest, most positive Adeline Hotel song to date, a fact which Knishkowy readily admits in an interview with our pals over at The Grey Estates. “‘Habits’ might be the first unabashedly joyful Adeline Hotel song,” he says, “one for windows down driving as summer fades to fall.”

This is true from the song’s very beginning, the whole thing suffused with a sense of golden sunlight, languorous percussion and dreamy guitar providing the perfect foil to Knishkowy’s smooth and earnest vocals.

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releases October 26th, 2018

Dan Knishkowy – words and guitars
Will Stratton – piano (1,2,4,5,6,8,9,10), electric guitar (1,2,4), bass (10)
Andrew Stocker – bass (1-9)
Ben Seretan – electric guitar (1-9)
Sean Mullins – drums and percussion (1-9)
Cassandra Jenkins – vocals (1,2,9,10)
Johanna Samuels – vocals (8)
Mike “Slo-Mo” Brenner – lap steel (2), pedal steel (9,10), bass lap steel (10)
Winston Cook-Wilson – keyboards (3,4,7)

All songs written by Dan Knishkowy 2016-2018.

Emily Brown is a Californian singer-songwriter and poet. Drawing comparisons to Joan Baez and Joni Mitchell, her clear voice, and carefully crafted lyrics draw from personal experience and literature.

‘Unseen Girl’ possesses the type of chords and indie girl vocals that beat a path to our door on a daily basis. This time however it comes fitted with an urgency that suggests an artist up for the fight and in the process cuts a fine Sharon Van Etten dash. On this evidence Emily Brown could well be on her way, a soft edged juggernaut at full tilt where nobody but the bad guys get hurt. It grows and it blooms, if only falling in love with somebody was this easy. Emily Brown’s new album ‘Bee Eater’ is out at the end of August.

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Releases August 31st, 2018

All songs written and performed by Emily Brown 

Lindenfield: guitar, bass, upright bass, piano, Farfisa, drums, synths
Jaxon Williams: guitar
Aaron Hatch: clarinet
Stuart Wheeler: french horn, vocals
Alyssa Pyper, Mary Nielson, Anne Bennion: violin
Sophie Blair, Michele Gardiner: viola
Max Olivier, Paul Woodward: cello

Toast is the living breathing music project of Claudia Mintz and frendz

Recorded out of our dorm rooms at Syracuse University, “Onetwothree” came together seamlessly. Josh and I (Claudia) have been best friends since our first day of college, so not only does he understand me as a person, he understands my writing and knows exactly how to compliment it with production. We work really well together. We’re a perfect musical match.

The song is dedicated to this very precarious time in our lives- moving out of our childhood homes and the start of college, where everything is a ‘first.’ The lyrics came out of me (Claud) immediately after hearing the track that Josh sent me. “Onetwothree” basically became our anthem for the rest of the semester. It’s about figuring out how to cope with feeling like you’re being misunderstood or not heard. As a queer person, I deal with this a lot, especially at such a big university. It’s so difficult to find your voice.

Josh and I met Max at a Sassy 009 show this past spring at SXSW. We definitely had the same music taste and started chatting. It all felt very natural, and Max immediately understood Toast and really believed in us from the start… We’re extremely thankful to be working with Terrible Records; some of our biggest influences have been/are artists on Terrible and has allowed us feel to feel like we can be honest and free with our art.

Everything and anything that has to do with Toast has been a dream so far. Josh and I have been releasing and performing music separately since we were both really young, but as soon as we started working together everything clicked. We are just having So much fun with it and are so ready to share with anyone who will listen.

Released August 3rd, 2018

Written and produced by Claudia Mintz and Joshua Mehling.

Since 1993, Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker the married couple whose heaven-and-earth harmonies have always held the band’s center—have pioneered a subgenre, shrugged off its strictures, recorded a Christmas classic, become a magnetic onstage force, and emerged as one of music’s most steadfast and vital vehicles for pulling light from our darkest emotional recesses. But Low will not commemorate its first quarter-century with mawkish nostalgia or safe runs through songbook favorites. Instead, in faithfully defiant fashion, Low will release its most brazen, abrasive (and, paradoxically, most empowering) album ever: Double Negative, an unflinching eleven-song quest through snarling static and shattering beats that somehow culminates in the brightest pop song of Low’s career.

To make Double Negative, Low reenlisted B.J. Burton, the quietly energetic and adventurous producer who has made records with James Blake, Sylvan Esso, and The Tallest Man on Earth in recent years while working as one of the go-to figures at Bon Iver’s home studio, April Base. Burton recorded Low’s last album, 2015’s Ones and Sixes, at April Base, adding might to many of its beats and squelch and frisson beneath many of its melodies.

This time, though, Sparhawk, Parker, and bassist Steve Garrington knew they wanted to go further with Burton and his palette of sounds, to see what someone who is, as Sparhawk puts it, “a hip-hop guy” could truly do to their music. Band and producer became collaborative cowriters, building the pieces up and breaking them down and building them again until their purpose and force felt clear.

‘Double Negative’ (Release date: September 14, 2018)

Low have shared a new video for “Rome (Always in the Dark)” which was directed by Aaron Anderson and Eric Timothy Carlson. The collage-like video accentuates the intense nature of the track, an insistent march forcing its way through the din of the album with a damn-the-torpedoes tenacity. “Let’s turn this thing up before they take us out…”

The album cover for Double Negative was created by longtime collaborator, English artist, Peter Liversidge.

The highly anticipated new album by Slothrust is finally here! The Pact is officially out today, The band just kicked off their fall North American tour with support from Summer Cannibals and Mannequin Pussy! They will also be crossing the pond to the UK & Europe in the new year!

Slothrust is principal songwriter, guitar player and unrepentant aesthete Leah Wellbaum, with drummer Will Gorin and bassist Kyle Bann. On their fourth full-length album The Pact, Slothrust constructs a luscious, ethereal cosmos perforated with wormy portals and magic wardrobes, demonstrating more clearly than ever the band’s deft shaping of contrasting sonic elements to forge a muscular sound that’s uniquely their own. Bizarre and mundane, tender and confident.

The awkward duality of the forever outsider, rightly reclaimed as power. This is The Pact. Produced and engineered by Billy Bush in Los Angeles (the band’s new home base), Slothrust’s new album is a confident journey across 12 songs that oscillate between a quietly reflective tenderness and a slick, sleek confidence; balancing playful innocence with ballsy swagger.

Fred Thomas had been making music nonstop for years when a seismic shift in his creative process happened in 2013. Something mystical opened up in the fall of that year and the prolific songwriter moved from his already emotionally open style into an unprecedentedly direct and vulnerable lyrical approach as well as new levels of detail-fixated production. The songs took on ​a ​new urgency​, inspired by a feeling that life was beginning afresh while at the same time a lifetime of experiences were cementing into worlds of memory.​ ​The results of that creatively eruptive time began with 2015’s critically hailed album All Are Saved, continued into the turbulent pop of 2017’s Changer and now ​float​ into Aftering, a record that feels like the final chapter of an unofficial trilogy.

Just as the two before it, Aftering was produced, mixed and assembled on location in a close collaboration between Thomas and Athens, Georgia based engineer Drew Vandenberg. All cut from the same cloth, Aftering ties the knots that connect all three records. Where both All Are Saved and Changer flitted nervously between moments of jangly power pop,​ electronic​ interludes and experimental acoustic weirdness, Aftering maps out a far more intentional arc, burning through a first act of ​speedy​, hook-h​e​a​vy guitar ​rock before taking a sharp, brutal dive into an abyss on the album’s second half.

Modeled loosely after Neil Young’s On The Beach, the nine songs here move from ​jumpy ​two minute blasts into a suite of ​four ​protracted​ and​ moody ​interconnected ​pieces​.​​ At first, ​Thomas‘ signature mesh of soaring melodies and experimental pop keeps things upbeat even when burying intense topics on songs like “Alcohol Poisoning” or in the post-election unrest of “Good Times Are Gone Again.” ​Beginning with 8-minute fever dream “House Show, Late December,” the ache​ that sits ​in the core of the ​album comes to the surface completely. From here guitars almost vanish from the instrumentation​ and​ the focus shift​s​ to tightly arranged strings, ominous synth​s​, ambient waves and ​spoken ​lyrics somewhere between poetry and desperate confession​. ​These longer songs drift in and out of each other slowly, drowning into their own lush darkness and heavy observations on anxiety, family and emotional abuse.

Connecting all three albums to an even deeper degree, Aftering finally realizes loose threads that began on earlier records, and calls on special guest​s​ from all phases of ​Thomas’​ life. Anna Burch returns to sing on ​buoyant ​single “Altar” and longtime friend and collaborator Elliot Bergman helps sculpt the ​crystalline​ vibe of album closer “What The Sermon Said.” Newer friends show up as well, with members of Bonny Doon, Common Holly, Deadbeat Beat and other artists ​Thomas connected with through years of touring showing up in supporting roles over the course of the record. Wolf Eyes member and noted memelord John Olson even contributes some fried horns and electronics.

More than anything, Aftering calmly sets down the restless questioning and turmoil of the trilogy. Instead of landing on any tidy conclusion or neatly wrapping up a thesis, the album illuminates the themes of observation and acceptance that have run throughout ​Thomas’ work for the last five years. Aftering reflects on an answerless and uncertain future, trying to make sense of it through scattered memories that flash like mental postcards. A sense of larger, universal ​dread ​refracts through these moments of searching. Ultimately, it’s not the dark times or bleakness that lingers, but a sense of connection and hope that comes from trying to communicate them as honestly as possible. Aftering, like the chapters that came just before, can feel sometimes​ painful, but there’s a clarity and beauty that’s always there as well, equally bright in even the darkest moments.

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released September 14th, 2018

In early 2016, Howe Gelb announced that, three decades after the release of Giant Sand’s first album, he decided the time had come to retire his long-running alt-country band, issuing a statement in which he declared, “30 years seems an adequate number to aptly utter ‘I kinda quit.'” Apparently, that qualifying “kinda” was included for a good reason, and in the fall of 2018, Gelb revealed he had put together a new lineup of Giant Sand and was returning to duty.

But where to start over? From the beginning, obviously, and the first album from Gelb’s new incarnation of the group, Returns to Valley of Rain, finds him re-recording the 11 tunes from Giant Sand’s 1985 debut, Valley of Rain. Exactly why Gelb would make a fresh start by revisiting a handful of songs he cut in the mid-’80s is hard to fathom, especially since he and his bandmates attack these songs in a manner that’s noticeably different than the original recordings but not so much that it qualifies as reinvention.

If the production on Valley of Rain marks it as a product of the era of too much digital reverb, Returns boasts a cleaner and more direct sound, and the vague jangle of the 1985 recordings is replaced by a harder, buzzier guitar attack; remarkably, Giant Sand sound more like a rough-and-tumble garage band in 2018 than they did the first time they cut these tunes. The guitar attack of Gelb, Gabriel Sullivan, and Annie Dolan is scrappy but full-bodied, and drummer Winston Watson and bassistsThøger T. Lund and Scott Garber hit hard enough without overpowering the natural dynamics of the performances. And there’s a welcome spontaneity to the sessions that flatters the dusty introspection of Gelb’s lyrics and the determined drift of the melodies. Figuring out the why of Returns to Valley of Rain is probably fruitless, but if Gelb wants to move forward into the past with Giant Sand, at least he’s doing so with style and swagger.